Wednesday, May 23, 2018

PetaPixel: Photographer Captures Eagle and Fox Fighting Over Rabbit in Midair

Wildlife photographer Kevin Ebi was out shooting a few days ago when he witnessed and photographed a crazy sight: a bald eagle and red fox fighting over a rabbit… in midair.

While photographing the non-native foxes in San Juan Island National Historical Park on San Juan Island in Washington state, Ebi spotted a young red fox carrying a rabbit it had caught across a meadow. As he panned his camera to follow that fox, a bald eagle suddenly swooped in from behind Ebi and grabbed the rabbit while it was in the fox’s mouth.

“To my surprise, the scene was even more dramatic than I expected,” Ebi writes on blog. “I thought the fox would drop the rabbit, giving the eagle an easy dinner.”

But no: the stubborn fox held on tightly to the rabbit and was itself carried more 20 feet into the air. The two predators struggled for about 8 seconds before the fox fell and hit the ground in a small cloud of dust (don’t worry: Ebi says the fox was perfectly fine afterward, but we’re guessing its ego might have been bruised).

Here’s a sequence of photos Ebi captured showing how the aerial tug-of-war played out:

Ebi’s work has appeared in some of the world’s biggest publications, including National Geographic, Smithsonian, Outdoor Photographer, and Lonely Planet. You can find more of his work on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. You can also purchase his images, prints, and calendars through his website, Living Wilderness. Ebi’s latest book is Our Land: it’s filled with his national parks photos and commemorates the centennial of the National Park Service.


P.S. It was just last month that photographer Doc Jon captured a photo of bird that caught a shark that caught a fish.


Image credits: Photographs by Kevin Ebi/Living Wilderness and used with permission



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PetaPixel: Perspective Distortion, Or: Why Lens Compression Doesn’t Exist

Here’s an enlightening 7-minute video by Fstoppers that explains why “lens compression” is a misconception that’s actually “perspective distortion”.

Basically, the reason a camera can “add 10 pounds” to a person isn’t due to the focal length of the lens used but rather the distance from the camera to the subject. But since that distance is largely dependent on how large the subject needs to appear in the frame, distortions are often explained as “lens compression.”

“These noticeable differences lead most photographers to believe that wide angle lenses are distorting a scene while telephoto lenses are compressing a scene, but they are overlooking what is actually happening: the camera is moving,” photographer Lee Morris says in the video. “In reality, the distance from the camera to the subject is what is creating these distortions.”

To demonstrate this, Morris shoots two portraits of the same subject, one with a 70mm lens and one with a 15mm lens but cropped to have the same field of view as the 70mm. The two photos have virtually identical perspective distortion.

If you bring the 15mm closer to the subject instead of cropping, the face becomes distorted due to the change in distance.



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